In Case You Missed It: The Shutdown and PA's Economy, Health Marketplaces, Property Taxes & More

In recent weeks, we blogged about the impact of the federal government shutdown on Pennsylvania's economy, the opening of the Health Insurance Marketplace, property tax bills with significant implications for school funding, a high-road restaurant owner's take on the minimum wage, Marcellus Shale-related employment, and the latest state revenue report.

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT:

  • On federal policy and the economy, Mark Price blogged that a prolonged federal government shutdown will harm the Pennsylvania economy and that it should be a top priority of the state's congressional delegation to pass a continuing resolution to fund the federal government before lasting damage is done.
  • On health care, Chris Lilienthal wrote about the opening of the Health Insurance Marketplace — the latest provision of the Affordable Care Act to take effect — and in the words of a Lancaster teacher "how life changing this will be for people who thought they would die without health insurance."
  • On property taxes and education funding, Michael Wood previewed property tax-shift bills moving through the House and wrote about one bill that won approval in the House last week. Sharon Ward blogged about how legislation to completely eliminate property taxes would threaten long-term public school funding. Chris Lilienthal wrote about a recent Capitol event that brought parents and other Pennsylvanians together to fight for more school funding and a fair distribution of those funds.
  • On the minimum wage, Stephen Herzenberg wrote about a high-road restaurant owner who is advocating for an increase in the minimum wage and the minimum wage paid to tipped workers.
  • On the Marcellus Shale, Mark Price blogged that shale-related employment fell in Pennsylvania in the most recent year.
  • And on state budget and taxes, Michael Wood wrote about a report showing that Pennsylvania General Fund revenue collections are on track a quarter way through the 2013-14 fiscal year.

IN OTHER NEWS:

  • The Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center (PBPC) has resources on what the Affordable Care Act means for Pennsylvania and a summary of Governor Corbett's "Healthy PA" plan, which takes the federal option to expand Medicaid health coverage under the health reform law and proposes other changes to the state's Medicaid program.
  • PBPC's latest chartbook shows state tax rates would have to more than double to replace local property tax dollars that support schools.
  • The Keystone Research Center released a pension primer examining a new three-pronged proposal released by Representative Glen Grell, including a new cash balance plan for future public employees. Read a press release on the report and a memo to editorial writers.
  • Read PBPC's press release on the September 30 Capitol event highlighting the opening of the Health Insurance Marketplace and watch the highlights below.

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