February 2017 Posts

On Retirement Security, Senators Casey and Toomey, Which Side Are You On?

There's another "which side are you on?" issue under consideration in Washington D.C., and it could come before Senators Casey and Toomey in a vote as early as this week.

The issue is retirement security in the private sector.

Every one of Pennsylvania's 13 Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives has already spoken. They are against itretirement security in the private sector that is. That means they are also against Main Street and for Wall Street. Good to know. 

Early Returns Look Good in Philadelphia's Nation-leading Fight for a Soda Tax

I wasn't surprised by the substantial revenues that the soda tax is bringing in, even while there is some reason to believe that soda consumption is down in the city, as we predicted it would be.

Impact of Repeal on the Number of Insured Pennsylvanians

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The below blog post is take from the PBPC report, “Devastation, Death, and Deficits: The Impact of ACA Repeal on Pennsylvania.”   

The first, and most important, aim of the Affordable Care Act was to reduce the number of uninsured Americans by means of two different policies. Americans with incomes too high to receive Medicaid but at or below 138% of the federal poverty line ($16,242 for a single individual and $33,465 for a family of four) can receive health insurance if their state expands Medicaid. Americans with incomes above 138% of the federal poverty line can purchase health insurance on a state or federally-run health care exchange, also known as a health care marketplace. Individuals and families with incomes up to 400% of the federal poverty line ($47,520 for a single individual and $97,200 for a family of four) are eligible to receive tax credits that reduce the costs of insurance purchased on the exchange. Those with lower incomes in this range are also eligible to receive cost-sharing reductions that limit their out of pocket health care costs.